Cubicle woes

The Guardian‘s Dear Jeremy column is about work and career-related problems. I read it every week as a way of remembering what employment is like.

I really love this week’s quandary. It is titled “I want to throttle my talkative office partner”.

I share an office with a woman who is in her late 30s. My problem is that she talks to herself – all day, every day. If she is writing an email she reads it out loud; if she is working on her PC she talks through the process. The boss won’t allow a radio and because I use the phone, I cannot wear headphones. I have tried doing the same but she just talks louder.

I have also tried saying “Sorry did you say something”, but this is obviously too subtle. I even said “Shush” once and told her to stop muttering to herself as I was trying to concentrate. She sulked for half an hour, then started again. Help – I might just throttle her soon.

Hahaha! Offices.

About

Robert Wringham is a humorist and the editor-in-chief of New Escapologist.

2 Responses to “Cubicle woes”

  1. I had a co-worker who would not only talk to herself non-stop and to me, but she would also SING. SONGS FROM HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL. AND BY DEMI LOVATO.
    There is sadly, nothing you can do, except change cubicles. For the safety of the other co-worker, of course.

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